Theosophia Pneumatica

Theosophia Pneumatica
Also known as The Little Keys of Solomon, this grimoire was published in 1686 in German. It possibly was included in the German edition of the Arbatel of Magic, a work it follows closely. Of anonymous authorship, the Theosophia Pneumatica makes no claims to ancient origins. Like the Arbatel, it is Christian in orientation and holds that the exaltation of prayer is the end of the Mystery. The Hebrew term Talmud—derived from the verb for “to learn”—is used to describe the aspiring magician. The author also was knowledgeable about alchemy and included references to it.
The only section of the Theosophia Pneumatica that differs significantly from the Arbatel is the appendix, which contains strong Christian elements and terminology used by the Swiss alchemist Paracelsus. It affirms that all things are threefold in nature after the model of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. Man is threefold, having a body, soul, and rational spirit. The body is of the earth. The soul is of the elements derived through the stars, is the seat of understanding, and is the genius for arts and sciences. The rational spirit is from God and is the medium through which divine inspiration enters the physical body. The soul and rational spirit are joined in marriage by God to reside in the body. Regeneration is achieved when the rational spirit overcomes the soul. There are two kinds of death: deterioration of the body and destruction of the soul via poisoned stellar influences. In either case, the rational spirit departs; it may also depart at the will of God. It is not possible to cure certain diseases by which God has chosen to afflict humankind. The unicorn, Quintessence, azoth, and philosopher’s stone are all useless. All other diseases can be cured with natural magic and alchemy.

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