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Tag Archives: Norse Mythology

Hymir

Hymir (the dark one) In Norse mythology, a sea giant who owned a large caldron that the gods wanted. Tyr and Thor went off to fetch it from the giant. In one telling of the myth Tyr eventually killed Hymir. In another version Thor knocked Hymir overboard from a ship, and he drowned. The myth is told in the poem …

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Hunding

Hunding In Norse mythology, a king defeated by Helgi. He appears in the Volsunga Saga and Richard Wagner’s Die Walküre, the second opera of Der Ring des Nibelungen. Hunding is portrayed in Arthur Rackham’s illustrations for Wagner’s Ring Cycle. Taken from the Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend, Third Edition – Written by Anthony S. Mercatante & James R. Dow …

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Hugin and Munin

Hugin and Munin (Huginn, Muninn) (thought and mind) In Norse mythology, two ravens who fly about the world, then sit on Odin’s shoulders, telling him what they have seen. Snorri Sturluson says in the Prose Edda: “Two ravens sit on his [Odin’s] shoulders and say into his ear everything they see or hear. Their names are Jugin and Munin. He …

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Utgard

Utgard (outer place) In Norse mythology, chief city of Jotunheim, the land of the giants. Its ruler was Skrymir, who was called UtgardLoki (Magus of Utgard) when he encountered Thor. Utgard appears in the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda. In some medieval literature Utgard and Loki are combined to form the name of a devil in Christian folklore. The …

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Urd

Urd (Urdhr) (the past) In Norse mythology, one of the three named Norns, the others being Verdandi and Skuld. Urd is the oldest of the Norns and looks to the past. Taken from the Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend, Third Edition – Written by Anthony S. Mercatante & James R. Dow Copyright © 2009 by Anthony S. Mercatante Back …

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Ull

Ull (Ullur, Ullr) (the shaggy one) In Norse mythology, stepson of Thor and son of Sif, Thor’s wife. He lived at Ydalir (yew valley). He is associated with winter and is known as an archer. In the Prose Edda it is said: “There is one called Ull, the son of Sif and stepson of Thor. He is such a good …

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Draugr

Draugr Also known as: Draugar; Draugr is singular and plural Origin: Scandinavia The Draugr are the living dead: animated corpses who emerge from the grave to roam about, causing havoc, trouble, and mayhem, not to mention panic. Draugr may be the walking dead, but they’re not horror movie zombies. They are not mindless, slow, or plodding. Instead, the Draugr develops …

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Heimdall

Heimdall Also known as: Rig; Rigr Origin: Norse Odin was walking by the sea when he discovered the Nine Wave Sisters, daughters of Aegir and Ran, sleeping on the sand. They were so beautiful, he fell in love with them all. Somehow, in a miracle of spirit genetics, the Nine Sisters conceived one son, Heimdall, from their joint romantic encounter …

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Gunlod

Gunlod Mother of Poetry Also known as: Gunnlod Origin: Norse Troll queen, Gunlod, was the guardian of the Mead of Poetry, which bestowed poetic skill. After Odin had acquired all the secrets, wisdom, and memory of the Nine Worlds, the Mead of Poetry was the one thing he lacked. He determined to obtain it as he perceived being a poet …

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Freki and Geri

Freki and Geri (greedy and ravenous) In Norse mythology, two wolves who sit by Odin, chief of the gods, when he feasts. Odin gives them all of the food set before him and drinks only wine, since food and wine are the same to the god. They appear in the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda Taken from the Encyclopedia …

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