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Tag Archives: Vampire Books

Shattered Glass – by Elaine Bergstrom

Shattered Glass, by Elaine Bergstrom (Berkley, 1989): This story of a single clan of alien vampires is the first book in a series that rivals Yarbro's Saint-Germain chronicles in its potential scope. The Austra family, though their origins are non-terrestrial, have been a part of human history for millennia. The title refers to their artistry in stained glass; unlike most …

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Those of My Blood – by Jacqueline Lichtenberg

Those of My Blood, by Jacqueline Lichtenberg (Saint Martin's, 1988): Alien vampires that originate on another planet rather than on Earth as a human mutation. A group of the luren, stranded on our world for generations, have developed into two factions, the Residents, who believe in responsible coexistence with humanity, and the Tourists, who exploit human beings as prey and …

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Salem's Lot – by Stephen King

Salem's Lot, by Stephen King (Doubleday, 1975): King's first major work. In the figure of Barlow, he transplants Count Dracula into a contemporary setting. King plays upon the isolation of a small town in Maine, exploring the possibility of its takeover by nonhuman forces, unknown to the rest of the world (a motif he returns to in The Tommyknockers). Like …

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The Dracula Tape – by Fred Saberhagen

The Dracula Tape, by Fred Saberhagen (Warner, 1975): An “interview” predating by a year the self-revelation of Rice's Louis. In the first serious novel to present a vampire's story from his or her own point of view, Count Dracula retells the events of Stoker's book on the tape recorder of a car belonging to a descendant of Jonathan and Mina …

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Hotel Transylvania – by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro

Hotel Transylvania, by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro (Saint Martin's, 1978): Though not so well known to non-specialists as Rice's characters, Yarbro's Saint-Germain is probably the best-loved of contemporary vampires. If Rice's fiction may be characterized as epic, Yarbro's is romance. Against her meticulously researched historical backgrounds, intimate exploration of human (whether living or Undead) emotions and relationships claims central importance. Saint-Germain …

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The Vampire Tapestry – by Suzy McKee Charnas

The Vampire Tapestry by Suzy McKee Charnas (Simon and Schuster, 1980): In my opinion, the most coherent and believable presentation of vampire-as-alien ever published. The first section of this five-part novel, “The Ancient Mind at Work,” published in the February, 1979, issue of Omni, presents the vampire, Dr. Edward Weyland, as a single-minded beast of prey with superior intelligence. A …

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The Hunger – by Whitley Strieber

The Hunger, by Whitley Strieber (William Morrow, 1981): Another alien vampire, quite different from Weyland in her orientation toward the human race. Unlike Charnas' vampire, who values his isolation and would not want to create his own rivals, Strieber's Miriam Blaylock craves human company. She considers human beings “pets” rather than livestock and futilely attempts to use her own blood …

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Fevre Dream – by George R. R. Martin

Fevre Dream, by George R. R. Martin (Simon and Schuster, 1982): Vampire-as-alien tale featuring a vampire subculture rather than a solitary predator. Set in the heyday of the Mississippi steamboats, this novel centers on Joshua, a vampire who, orphaned in childhood, grows up believing himself an aberrant human being. Eventually he realizes that he is neither human nor supernatural (religious …

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Blood Hunt – by Lee Killough

Blood Hunt, by Lee Killough (TOR, 1987): A rare example of a fictional vampire who is a truly nice person, without possessing the superhuman charisma of Saint-Germain. Like Matheson, Killough postulates that vampirism is an infectious disease, though in Blood Hunt the hypothesis is merely assumed by the vampires without being elaborated in any way. As in Rice's trilogy, a …

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Those Who Hunt the Night – by Barbara Hambly

Those Who Hunt the Night, by Barbara Hambly (Ballantine, 1988): Another “good vampire / bad vampire” novel with a strong period atmosphere. In Victorian England a husband-wife investigative team, Prof. James Asher and his wife Lydia, are commissioned by Simon Ysidro to find out who has been murdering London's vampires. To call Simon “good” is less than accurate; Hambly's Undead …

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