Daedala

Daedala (derived from the name Daedalus) In ancient Greek cult, a festival in honor of Hera by the Boetians. It commemorated the myth about Hera leaving Zeus and hiding. The god said he would then marry another and had a wooden image dressed up as his bride. When Hera believed Zeus was to marry another, she reappeared and attacked the “bride,” only to discover it was a wooden statue. Part of the rites of the festival consisted of dressing a statue and offering a goat to Zeus and a cow to Hera.

SOURCE:

Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend, Third Edition – Written by Anthony S. Mercatante & James R. Dow– Copyright © 2009 by Anthony S. Mercatante

Greek Magick

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