Spittle

spittle A key ingredient in many spells and Curses. One way to throw a curse is to spit on a stone and rub it while reciting the curse. In Lapland lore, illness and misfortune can be brought upon a person by spitting three times upon a knife and then rubbing the knife on the victim. Another Lapland spell for dooming someone to destruction calls for tying three knots in a linen towel in the name of the Devil, spitting on them and naming the victim. marquesan sorcerers spit into leaves and bury them while reciting incantations against enemies. malay sorcerers place spit, blood, urIne and excrement on clay effigies, which they roast to curse a victim to death (see sorcery). Necromancers sometimes spit as part of their rituals for conjuring the spirits of the dead (see necromancy).

In other folk Magic beliefs, the saliva of the victim is believed to boost the power of the spell. Therefore, some people believe it is unwise to spit indiscreetly, as it enables Demons to capture one’s saliva and use it for evil purpose. Among the tribes of East Africa, South Africa and New Zealand, spittle is hidden lest it fall into the hands of a sorcerer. European witch-hunters believed that witches could not shed tears but would try to fool inquisitors by smearing their cheeks with spittle.

In folk magic, spitting is a universal defense against the Evil Eye, bad luck, illness and witchcraft. Practices that date back to early roman times include spitting in the right shoe every morning; spitting into the toilet after urination; spitting on the breast or on the ground three times; and spitting while passing any place where danger might exist. Pliny records the effectiveness of spittle against various disorders, such as boils, eye infections, epilepsy and leprosy. Spittle is especially potent in protecting infants and children against fascination (another term for Evil Eye).

In Italy, persons who are suspected of overlooking children (casting the Evil Eye on them) are asked to spit in their faces to nullify the harm done. The custom of spitting into the hands before a fight in order to make the blows stronger dates back to early roman times. Spitting salted water at haunted locations protects one from any negative presences.

FURTHER READING:

  • Leach, Maria, ed., and Jerome Fried, assoc. ed. Funk & Wagnall’s Standard Dictionary of Folklore, Mythology and Legend. New York: Harper & row, 1972.
  • Mickaharic, Draja. A Century of Spells. York Beach, me.: Samuel Weiser, 1988.
  • Parrinder, Geoffrey. Witchcraft European and African. London: Faber & Faber, 1970.

SOURCE:

The Encyclopedia of Witches, Witchcraft and Wicca – written by Rosemary Ellen Guiley – Copyright © 1989, 1999, 2008 by Visionary Living, Inc.

spittle Ingredient in magical Spells. Spittle has been held to possess magical power since ancient times. It plays a role in sympathetic magic along with other issuances from the body and body parts, such as HAIR AND NAIL CLIPPINGS, Blood, Urine, and excrement. The principle behind the magical power is that something that is connected to the body makes a magical connection for a spell to take hold. Spittle also carries the intent in the casting of a spell. 298 spell Spittle is included in the making of magical objects such as Poppets, Fetishes, Charm BAGS, GRIS-GRIS, and other Amulets AND TalismanS, and imbues the essence and intent of the person doing the creating. A common magical technique of casting a Bewitchment, HEX, or Curse is to spit on an object, such as a doll, a stone, or KNOTS, while the spell is recited. Sometimes the object is ritually destroyed after being spit upon, which carries the magical power of destruction to the victim. Necromancers sometimes spit as part of their rituals for conjuring the spirits of the dead. Widespread folk beliefs address the need to be careful about where and how one spits, for an evil sorcerer, a witch, or even a Demon could capture spittle and use it against a person. Spitting is a universal defense against the Evil Eye, bad luck, illness, and Witchcraft. Practices that date back to early Roman times include spitting in the right shoe every morning; spitting into the toilet after urination; spitting on the breast or on the ground three times; and spitting while passing any place where danger might exist. Pliny records the effectiveness of spittle against various disorders such as boils, eye infections, epilepsy, and leprosy. Spittle is especially potent in protecting infants and children against FASCINATION. In Italy, persons who are suspected of overlooking children (the Evil Eye) are asked to spit in their faces to nullify the harm done. The custom of spitting into the hands before a fight to make the blows stronger dates back to early Roman times.

SOURCE:

The Encyclopedia of Magic and Alchemy Written by Rosemary Ellen Guiley Copyright © 2006 by Visionary Living, Inc.

Related Articles

Charms

charms Magical words, phrases, chants (see chanting) and incantations used in the casting of spells. Charms have been common since ancient times. Some charms are…

Sending

Sorcerers in many cultures send animals, birds, insects, spirits, animated objects and allegedly even bewitched corpses to carry out Curses—usually of death— against victims (see…

Pins

Pins are used in some magical spells and in sympathetic Magic. Stray pins always should be picked up, according to superstition; otherwise a witch will…

Footprints

footprints Footprints are reputed to contain the essence of a person and may be used in magical charms and spells. Dust or dirt taken from…