Haunted Indiana

Reeder Road – Griffith

Reeder Road, also known as Redar Road, is a well-known haunted location in Northwest Indiana. This five-mile road meanders between Griffith and Merrillville, though it isn’t listed on every area map anymore. It is located south of Oak Ridge Park off of Colfax Street in Griffith and is nestled within the confines of mysterious-looking woods. According to accounts of teenagers ...

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Stepp Cemetery – Martinsville

Stepp Cemetery has a long reputation for being haunted. Today, the grounds are tucked away five miles inside the dark Morgan-Monroe State Forest. The cemetery was originally a pioneer cemetery started in the early 1800s. Locals tell the sad story of a woman who tragically lost her baby son during the mid-1930s and had the baby buried in the nearby ...

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Willard Library – Evansville

This Gothic library building was not considered haunted until 1936, when a custodian quit after repeatedly encountered the apparition of a lady in gray in the basement. Since then, janitors, employees, and patrons of the Willard Library have all reported sensing the elusive ghost, sometimes only a cold spot or the odor of perfume. The Lady in Gray has been ...

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Seven Pillars on the Old Frances Sloccum Trail

For the tribe of Miami Indians that inhabited the Mississinewa River valley, “Seven Pillars” was more than a landmark of natural beauty. It was a “gateway to the other world.” Here the Tribal Council would meet within the grotto-like alcoves, feeling that their ancestors would be present to help guide them with their wisdom. It was also where criminal proceedings ...

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The Gravesite of James Dean

In the 1950s, James Dean was the living embodiment of teen angst and swaggering cool. In death, he became a largerthan- life legend, forever young and rebellious. And some would say that Dean’s restlessness in life carried over to his afterlife as well.

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Mississinewa Battlefield

In the early morning hours of December 18, 1812, the cacophony of combat echoed across the Mississinewa River. Lt. Colonel J.B. Campbell and his beleaguered Dragoons found themselves assaulted by an outnumbered but desperate band of Miami Indian warriors. There would be no winners on this bloody day.

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