Al-farabi

Al-farabi (d. 954) was an Arab alchemist second to Jabir Ibn Hayyan (Geber) in repute during his lifetime.

Al-farabi was a learned man who led a wandering life in search of the secrets of alchemy. He entertained at court but never accepted invitations to stay. He said he would never rest until he discovered the philosopher’s stone. In Syria he entertained the Sultan Seiffeddoulet and the same evening set out on a journey through the desert. He was set upon by thieves and murdered.

Al-farabi is said to have authored several manuscripts on alchemy and the sciences, but none survive.

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SOURCE:

The Encyclopedia of Magic and Alchemy  Written by Rosemary Ellen Guiley Copyright © 2006 by Visionary Living, Inc.

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