Aeaea

Aeaea In Greek mythology, a female hunter who was changed by the gods into an island of the same name to help her escape the pursuit of Phasis, a river god. Odysseus stayed on Aeaea with Circe for a year according to Homer’s Odyssey. The poet, however, does not identify the location of the island. Later writers have placed it off the western coast of Italy. Cape Cicero, which is south of Rome and was once an island, has also been cited as the original Aeaea.

SOURCE:

Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend, Third Edition – Written by Anthony S. Mercatante & James R. Dow-Copyright © 2009 by Anthony S. Mercatante

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