Agama

Agama In Mahayana Buddhism, a term used for the collection of sacred writings, roughly equivalent to the Nikaya collection of Theravada Buddhism, containing the discourses of Buddha on general topics. Because Buddha’s doctrines were often abstruse and mysterious, he decided to preach his sermons in accordance with the intellectual capacity of his audience. He then divided them into five categories, with the Agamas devoted to the doctrine of substantiality.

SOURCE:

Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend, Third Edition – Written by Anthony S. Mercatante & James R. Dow– Copyright © 2009 by Anthony S. Mercatante

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