Ennead

Ennead (nine) In Egyptian mythology, nine deities whose characteristics symbolize the elemental-primal forces in the universe. The Great Ennead revolved around the mythology of Heliopolis, a suburb of modern Cairo, and consisted of Atum the sole creator, his offspring Shu (air) and Tefnut (water), and their children Geb (earth), Nut (sky), Isis, Osiris, Seth, and Nephthys. As time passed, other cult centers developed their own enneads, and therefore the numbers varied. The ennead at Thebes consisted of 15 deities, and that of Hermopolis consisted of 8. The latter became so famous that it is called the Ogdoad of Hermopolis (the eight deities of that site). They were Nun and Naunet, Huh and Hauhet, Kuk and Kauket, Amen and Amunet. The four male gods were portrayed as frogheaded; the females were shown as snakeheaded.

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Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend, Third Edition – Written by Anthony S. Mercatante & James R. Dow– Copyright © 2009 by Anthony S. Mercatante

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