Lake Monsters

The term lake monsters refers to mysterious beasts that are said to live in certain bodies of water. Among the best-known examples of such beasts are the Loch Ness monsters in Scotland, Ogopogo of Lake Okanagan in British Columbia, and Champ of Lake Champlain in the northeastern United States. There are, however, more than three hundred lakes believed to be inhabited by lake monsters; most are very deep and very cold, and the creatures themselves seem to have commonalities as well.

Typically, all are said to have elongated bodies, variously characterized as serpentlike, wormlike, or dragonlike. Usually they are said to move in an undulating fashion when on the surface of the water, which has led some cryptozoologists to speculate that lake monsters might actually be a zeuglodon, a snakelike primitive whale known to have existed but which most scientists say became extinct millions of years ago. There have been many reported sightings of lake monsters by credible witnesses, but none has ever been confirmed.

There have also been photographs taken of lake monsters, but skeptics dismiss all of them as fakes. Indeed, during the nineteenth century there were many confirmed hoaxes involving lake monsters. Moreover,throughout history there have been many sightings of lake monsters that later proved to be cases of mistaken identity.

The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Paranormal Phemomena

Bessie

Bessie

For some time people have been reporting an unknown creature-later nicknamed South Bay Bessie or just plain Bessie-in Lake Erie ...
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Brosnie

Brosnie

According to news reports that circulated in late 1996, residents of Benyok, 250 miles northwest of Moscow, had reported a ...
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Carabuncle

Carabuncle

Carabuncle : Freshwater Monster of Ireland, as well as a mysterious South American animal. Etymology: From the Latin carbunculus (“gem”) ...
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Champ

Champ

The Lake Champlain monster, or “Champ,” is credited with a long history, which it may or may not deserve. In ...
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Dobhar-chu

Dobhar-chu

Among the legendary beasts of Ireland is something called the dobhar-chu (Gaelic for “water hound”), a mysterious and dangerous creature ...
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Emela-ntouka

Emela-ntouka

Emela-ntouka is Lingala for “Killer of Elephants” or “Water-Elephant.” The alleged animal is also referred to as aseka-moke, ngamba-namae, and ...
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Flathead Lake Monster

Flathead Lake Monster

Witnesses describe the Flathead Lake Monster, said to inhabit northwestern Montana’s Flathead Lake, as more than ten feet long. Some ...
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Igopogo

Igopogo

Lake Simcoe, Ontario, is where a monster the locals call Igopogo (it is a play on the popular British Columbia ...
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Iliamna Lake Monster

Iliamna Lake Monster

Iliamna Lake, near Alaska’s southern coast, is eighty miles long and twenty-five miles wide in spots; it covers 1,033 square ...
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Manipogo

Manipogo

Manipogo—a name inspired by British Columbia’s Ogopogo—is the moniker given to the Lake Monster that allegedly roars and lives in ...
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Morag

Morag

The Morag is a lake monster, similar to those reported in Loch Ness, that has been sighted in Loch Morar, ...
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Mosqueto

Mosqueto

Mosqueto : Freshwater Monster of New York. Etymology: Oneida (Iroquoian) word. Distribution: Lake Onondaga, New York. Significant sighting: The Oneidas ...
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Nahuelito

Nahuelito

A Lake Monster reported in the Nahuel Huapí Lake of Argentina and Patagonia is called Nahuelito (after the lake where ...
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Ogopogo

Ogopogo

The monsters of Lake Okanagan, British Columbia, are known both as Ogopogo and by their native name, naitakas. They were ...
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Paddler

Paddler

In the early 1940s, near Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, Lake Monsters—or at least reports of them—began to show up in Lake ...
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Seileag

Seileag

Seileag : Freshwater Monster of Scotland. Etymology: From the Gaelic an t-Seileag, a feminine diminutive derived from the name of ...
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