Lampades

The Lampades, infernal Nymphs, inhabit Hades. Their origins are murky: they may or may not be daughters of Nyx and/or the various river deities of Hades. The Lampades serve in Hekate’s entourage: they are her lamp-bearers, servants, and companions. Their torches serve to illuminate the night. The Lampades are spirits of prophesy and justice.

Whether or not it is safe for humans to encounter or witness them is up to the Lampades to decide or subject to their whim. If the Lampades so desire, then the sight of their lit torches will drive a viewer mad. Alternatively, their torch light can reveal lost, hidden or necessary information. They may be invoked for assistance.

Should one find oneself in trouble with the Lampades who, like many Nymphs, have a teasing nature, appeal to Hekate to make them behave. They will obey her and may be venerated alongside her. They may also be venerated alongside Nyx, Artemis, Demeter and/or Persephone.

ORIGIN:

Greece

CLASSIFICATION:

Nymphs; Chthonic spirits

ATTRIBUTE:

torch

SEE ALSO:

SOURCE:

Encyclopedia of Spirits: The Ultimate Guide to the Magic of Fairies, Genies, Demons, Ghosts, Gods & Goddesses – Written by Judika Illes Copyright © 2009 by Judika Illes.

FURTHER READING:

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