Harvey, Graham

Harvey, Graham (1959– ) – Lecturer in religious studies at the Open University, Great Britain. In addition to an edited volume (2003) collecting some of the most significant writings about shamans, their activities, and their worldviews, Harvey has written about the “new animism” and other works that engage with the wider indigenous religious contexts in which some shamans work. His writings about Pagans include discussion of shamanic influences and practices in the movement. He has also coedited a volume (with Karen Ralls, 2001) concerned with “indigenous religious musics” to which a number of significant ethnomusicologists contributed, several discussing music and trance and developing Gilbert Rouget’s argument.

SOURCE:

Historical Dictionary of Shamanism by Graham Harvey and Robert J. Wallis 2007

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