Langsuir

Langsuir

Also known as:

Langsuyar

Origin:

Malay

Langsuir are Malaysian vampires; the wrathful spirits of women who died giving birth. The trauma of delivering a still-born child may also allegedly transform women into Langsuir. There are different versions of the Langsuir’s origins and how she manifests. According to one myth, Langsuir rise from the grave forty days following death, hungering for blood. The Langsuir roams about, searching for victims, her first choice is infants; however she is a threat to all. The Langsuir has a hole in the back of her neck with which she feeds on blood. (Unlike Hollywood vampires, she doesn’t sprout huge teeth and suck with her mouth.)

The Langsuir can be rehabilitated and allegedly, despite forty days in the grave, many are very beautiful: if you cut off her hair and stuff it into the hole in her neck, the Langsuir is allegedly transformed into a docile, obedient creature. Legends tell of tamed Langsuir who have married and gone on to live normal lives. However, they must be kept very serene and sedate, virtually tranquilized. Dancing, high spirits, any kind of enhanced emotion may cause her to revert to her vampiric Langsuir nature.

Manifestation:

The Langsuir has long hair with which she hides the hole in her neck. She may manifest or travel in the form of an owl. Modern descriptions of sightings of the Langsuir often correspond to standard East Asian ghost women who wander in filmy white shroud-like garments.

See Also:

  • Aswang

Source:

Encyclopedia of Spirits: The Ultimate Guide to the Magic of Fairies, Genies, Demons, Ghosts, Gods & Goddesses – Written by: Judika Illes Copyright © 2009 by Judika Illes.

You may be also interested in :

In Search of Dracula: The History of Dracula and Vampires - Radu Florescu, Raymond T. McNally
Vampires, Burial, and Death Folklore and Reality - Paul Barber
Dracula and the Eastern Question : British and French Vampire Narratives of the Nineteenth-Century Near East - Matthew Gibson
Vampire God : The Allure of the Undead in Western Culture – Mary Hallab
Book of the Witch Moon: Chaos, Vampiric & Luciferian Sorcery - Michael W. Ford
Vlad the Impaler: A Captivating Guide to How Vlad III Dracula Became One of the Most Crucial Rulers of Wallachia and His Impact on the History of Romania
Vampires of the Slavs - Jan L. Perkowski
Countess Dracula : Life and Times of Elisabeth Bathory, the Blood Countess - Tony Thorne
Infamous Lady : The True Story of Countess Erzsébet Báthory -  Kimberly L. Craft
The Vampire Gate; the Vampyre Magician - Michael W. Ford
The Vampire : A Casebook - Alan Dundes
Dracula, Prince of Many Faces His Life and His Times - Florescu Radu R, McNally Raymond T.
Dracula : An International Perspective - Marius-Mircea Crișan
Vampyre Magick: The Grimoire of the Living Vampire -  Father Sebastiaan
Vampires : The Myths, Legends, and Lore - Aubrey Sherman
Dracula's Guest- A Connoisseurs Collection of Victorian Vampire Stories - Sims Michael
Vampires and Madness - Valerie Pedlar
From Demons to Dracula: The Creation of the Modern Vampire Myth - Matthew Beresford
The Vampire His Kith and Kin - Montague Summers
Slayers and Their Vampires : A Cultural History of Killing the Dead - Bruce McClelland
Vampyre Sanguinomicon: The Lexicon of the Living Vampire –  Father Sebastiaan
ajax-loader